FOSAF NEWS - Institutional change institutional isolation and biodiversity governance in South Africa by Juniours Marire

The world, in recent decades, has witnessed an incalculable surge in global "wicked" policy problems that have long-term, and most often irreversible, impacts, not least terrorism, climate change, biodiversity losses and desertification. Wicked problems are wicked because there is no single epistemological system that can adequately coordinate policy action for addressing them. Literature abounds with international case studies of opposition to national institutions that are designed to put into effect global and regional policies for resolving wicked problems. This raises questions about what constitutes reasonable institutions, how such institutions can be designed and why societies sometimes fail to develop such institutions despite the obvious need for them.

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The world, in recent decades, has witnessed an incalculable surge in global "wicked" policy problems that have long-term, and most often irreversible, impacts, not least terrorism, climate change, biodiversity losses and desertification. Wicked problems are wicked because there is no single epistemological system that can adequately coordinate policy action for addressing them. Literature abounds with international case studies of opposition to national institutions that are designed to put into effect global and regional policies for resolving wicked problems. This raises questions about what constitutes reasonable institutions, how such institutions can be designed and why societies sometimes fail to develop such institutions despite the obvious need for them.

Click here to read the full PDF

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